God, the Black Female | Black Slaves, Red Masters | Kenyan Prisoners Vote

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September 14 - September 27, 2017
 
 
 
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On The Dock This Issue:
 
adam and God as Black females
The Creation of God by Harmonia Rosales
Harmonia Rosales' re-imaging of Michelangelo's "The Creation of Adam," featuring both Adam and God as Black women struck a chord with people.
 
New Mississippi Museum Faces the State’s Racism
The names of every person known to have been lynched in Mississippi will be etched into columns throughout the museum.
 
Future International African American Museum Launches Center to Trace Genealogy
The International African American Museum (Charleston, South Carolina) is striving to be more than just a collection of exhibits and historical artifacts.
 
Kenya Allows Current Prisoners to Vote, Florida Does Not Include Former Prisoners
For the first time ever, Kenya allowed incarcerated people to vote in this year’s presidential election - - a democratic right that prisoners in most American states don’t enjoy.
 
Online Tool Highlights Racial and Gender Inequities
The teaching and informational tool shows how people of color and women make up the majority of the low-wage workforce and are disproportionately affected by unfair policies and practices.
 
A Port of Harlem Fall at the Alexandria Black History Museum
Sam Ford, general assignment reporter for Washington, D.C.’s ABC7/News Channel 8, talks about being a descendant of Africans owned by Native Americans.
 
Activities
Interesting, diverse things to do
 
Readers' Trends
See what is most popular in Port Of Harlem's e-mailed issue, and on our web, Pinterest, and Facebook pages.
 
 
 
Features

The Creation of God by Harmonia Rosales

creation of God

.

harmonia rosales



Harmonia Rosales knows that we are all created in God's image, and her re-imaging of Michelangelo's "The Creation of Adam," featuring both Adam and God as Black women struck a chord with people around the world.  Now, for the first time, the 33-year-old Chicago native is exhibiting her work in a gallery setting, premiering new paintings at Simard Bilodeau Contemporary.

"Replacing the White male figures (the most represented) with people I believe have been the least represented can begin to recondition our minds to accept new concepts of human value,” says Rosales, who is of Afro-Cuban descent. “I wanted to take a significant painting, a widely recognized painting that subconsciously or consciously conditions us to see White male figures as powerful and authoritative and flip the script, establish a counter narrative. White figures are a staple in classic art featured in major museums. They are the 'masters' of the masterpieces. Why should that continue?"

“By re-working these very famous historical paintings that features White men, she empowers herself (and other women of color) from a historical perspective,” says gallery director and co-owner Eve-Marie Bilodeau. Simard Bilodeau Contemporary is a Fine Art gallery based in Los Angeles, CA and Shanghai, China. Her exhibit will feature additional works inspired by others including Da Vinci and Botticelli.

The self-taught artist, who graduated from Champaign Central High School and attended the University of Illinois Champaign Urbana before landing back in the Windy City, is sending a loud message of empowerment and equality through her other works, too.
White figures are a staple in classic art featured in major museums. They are the 'masters' of the masterpieces. Why should that continue?"
The California Gallery is at 1923 S. Santa Fe Avenue, Suite 100, in downtown Los Angeles. The opening reception is Sunday, September 17, from 12p-6p. The exhibit will include a celebrity VIP reception September 16 from 4p-8p. The exhibit is open until Sunday, October 15. .
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 dr theo hodge jr/capital medical associates
 
 
 
New Mississippi Museum Faces the State’s Racism


mississippi civil rights museum



The newly built Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum - interconnected museums that will take visitors through the sweep of Mississippi history and the state's role as ground zero in the Civil Rights Movement - will open in Jackson on December 9 as the capstone of the state's bicentennial celebration. The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum will be the only state-operated civil rights museum in the nation.

“This endeavor is a huge step in the right direction for the state of Mississippi. The African American population in Mississippi is one of the historically largest in the country,” said Dr. Ida Jones, author of “William Henry Jernagin in Washington, DC: Faith in the Fight for Civil Rights.” Jernagin was born in Mashulaville, Mississippi and despite being born “in the cauldron of utter racial hatred,” rose to prominence in the National Baptist Convention, she continued.

The Museum of Mississippi History explores the state from prehistoric times to present day and even faces its racism including “the broken promises of Reconstruction,” reported its press office. Music fans, will thrill to the sounds of Muddy Waters, Tammy Wynette, and Jimmy Buffett, the press release continued.

The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum will chronicle the pivotal role of the Mississippi Movement. Visitors will witness “the systematic oppression” of Black Mississippians during the Jim Crow era and their fight for equality that transformed the state and nation. The names of every person known to have been lynched in Mississippi will be etched into columns throughout the museum.

Visitors will emerge from these galleries into an open central space defined by a soaring sculpture that will light up and play "This Little Light of Mine" or “Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around” when people approach it. The sculpture will honor Mississippi's grassroots Movement veterans and celebrates the potential within every person to make a difference. The museum's final gallery will engage visitors in the ongoing conversation about the progress that has been made - and the challenges that remain.

“These kinds of actions are long overdue,” commented Port Of Harlem Praising the Past contributor CR Gibbs. Gibbs provides a number of free Black history lectures in Metro Washington, D.C. “Finally, the ghosts that linger over Mississippi will dissipate in the light of historical truth and equity,” added Jones, who is also Morgan State University’s archivist.

“I hope that the Museum will point out the number and actions of Confederate deserters and of the loyal groups such as the Newton Knight Company that fought against the secessionists in Mississippi and its long refusal to advance education and healthcare for all,” stated Marvin Jones, who will conduct the history lecture “Haiti & the American Civil War” in Greenbelt, MD on October 3.

The Mississippi Legislature provided $90 million to build the two museums, which include a shared lobby, auditorium, temporary exhibit galleries, classrooms, collection storage, and exhibit workshop, covering 200,000 square feet - the equivalent of three and a half football fields. Donors gave an additional $17 million for exhibits and endowments.
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Future International African American Museum Launches Center to Trace Genealogy

charlestown musem



The future Charleston, South Carolina International African American Museum (IAAM) is striving to be more than just a collection of exhibits and historical artifacts. When it opens in Fall 2019,  the institution wants to extend its mission of understanding Black family history to individual visitors, starting with its new Center for Family History.  

Described on its website as "a one of a kind, unprecedented research center with a special focus on African-American genealogy," the Center for Family History includes an extensive collection of archival material and records that historians and genealogists can reference to help visitors learn more about their own ancestors' lives. (The new National African American History and Cultural Museum in Washington, D.C. also devotes space to genealogy.)

Read More
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Kenya Allows Current Prisoners to Vote, Florida Does Not Include Former Prisoners

kenya votes



For the first time ever, Kenya allowed incarcerated people to vote in this year’s presidential election - -  a democratic right that prisoners in most American states don’t enjoy. However, the 2017 presidential election results have since been overturned by the Supreme Court which ruled that the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission must conduct a fresh presidential election poll within 60 days of September 1, in strict adherence to the law. And, prisoners will go back to the polls with their fellow Kenyans.

Read More

Meanwhile, The American Civil Liberties Union is committing at least $5 million to the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition’s campaign to put a voting rights referendum on the 2018 ballot. The ballot measure would automatically restore voting rights to most individuals upon completion of their prison, probation, or parole sentence.

The state requires 766,200 valid signatures (or 8 percent of the voter turnout in the last presidential election) to get an initiative on the ballot, but activists are shooting for one million by December 31st to ensure they have enough valid signatures. If the referendum garners enough signatures and is placed on the 2018 ballot, it will need support from 60 percent of voters to pass.
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Online Tool Highlights Racial and Gender Inequities


clockingin



Race Forward presents “Clocking-In,” an interactive, multimedia tool that highlights racial and gender inequities in the restaurant, retail, and domestic industries. The tool is based on the real life experiences of workers across the United States.

The teaching and informational tool  shows how people of color and women make up the majority of the low-wage workforce in restaurant, retail, and domestic industries and are disproportionately affected by unfair policies and practices related to wages, hours, mobility, and benefits. It also provides solutions for racial and gender equity in the workplace. There is a supporting Tumblr for workers to submit their experiences, share success, and upload photos.

Race Forward advances racial justice through research, media, and practice. Race Forward also publishes the daily news site Colorlines and presents Facing Race, the country’s largest multiracial conference on racial justice.  Port Of Harlem featured one of Colorlines’ articles in the last issue of Port Of Harlem: The Dos and Dont's of Talking to Kids of Color About White Supremacy.
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A Port of Harlem Fall at the Alexandria Black History Museum

sam ford



The Alexandria Black History Museum hosts a series of programs from the pages of Port of Harlem magazine. All programs open with a 15-minute reception with light refreshments. Reservations are strongly encouraged. To reserve your seat, call the Museum at 703.746.4356, or email Port Of Harlem events: The lineup includes:

Saturday, September 30, 11 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Film and Discussion - Black Slaves, Red Masters – Looks at a little-known part of American history when the five “civilized” Native American ethnic groups owned Africans. In the 23-minute film, Sam Ford, general assignment reporter for Washington, D.C.’s ABC7/News Channel 8, talks about being a descendant of Africans owned by Native Americans. After the film, he continues with how the recent August 30th court decision, that ruled that the descendants of the Cherokee Nation’s slaves are entitled to tribal citizenship, affects him and his family. Fee $5

Thursday, October 26, 7 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Film and Discussion - Breathe in the Roots - The 75-minute film tells the story of Ty Christen Joseph, a young African-American English teacher, who takes a spiritual journey of discovery from Addis Ababa to Lalibela, one of Ethiopia's holiest pilgrimage sites, on horseback, while showcasing a side of Ethiopia many rarely experience.

Following the film, Indrias G. Kassaye, the film’s writer, photographer, and producer talks about how the film helps him fulfill his mission of contributing to his country’s development and the African renaissance. Fee:  $10

Saturday, November 4, 11 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Film and Discussion - Against All Odds: The Fight for a Black Middle Class - During the 60-minute film, former New York Times op-ed columnist Bob Herbert connects the dots of American history to reveal how injustices from reduced educational opportunity and the inequitable application of the GI bill to housing segregation converged to systematically limit the ability of Blacks to ascent through the traditional route of home ownership and its effect on Black families from generation to generation.

Following the film, Ivan Brown, owner of Ivan Brown Realty and past president of the Washington, DC chapter of the National Association of Real Estate Brokers (NAREB), adds a realtor’s  historical view on past laws and customs and today’s current struggle for housing. NAREB was founded in 1947 when Blacks were not allowed to join similar White associations.  Free

Free street parking is available. Screening of "Black Slaves, Red Masters" is $5 and that of "Breathe in the Roots" is $10. Donations for "Against All Odds:  The Fight for a Black Middle Class" is encouraged to support future programming.

The Alexandria Black History Museum is at 902 Wythe Street, Alexandria, Virginia,  22314, five blocks from the Braddock Road Metro Station on the Yellow and Blue Lines.  For more information, please call 703.746.4356.
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champion services travel - group travel
 
 
 
Activities

columbia festival



Washington
Dick Gregory Celebration of Life
City of Praise
8501 Jericho City Drive
Landover, MD
Sat, Sep 16, 4p (doors open at 3p), free

Evening of Cultures
The Great Hall
1 Veterans Place
(Downtown Silver Spring)
Silver Spring, MD
Fri, Sep 22, 6:30p-11:45p, $25

The Beatley Central Library's Fall Festival
5005 Duke St
Alexandria, VA
Sat, Sep 23, 10a-3p, free

Film and Discussion:
Forgotten Warriors of the Empire
(Unsung African Heroes of World War II)
Alexandria Black History Museum
902 Wythe Street
Tue, Sep 26, 7p, free

Baltimore
Baltimore County African American Cultural Festival
Towson Patriot Plaza
401 Bosley Ave
Towson, Maryland
Sat, Sep 16, 10a-8p, free

Spice Band
3rd Thursdays Live Jazz After Hour Series
(Cash Bar/Food Available for purchase)
Reginald F. Lewis Museum
830 E Pratt
Thu, Aug Sep 21, 6p, $8-$10

Columbia, SC
Columbia at Jubilee:
Festival of Black History & Culture
Mann-Simons Site, Downtown
1403 Richland Street
Sat, Sep 16, 11a-6p, free

New York
The Peculiar Patriot
National Black Theater
2031 5th Avenue
through Sat, Oct 1, $

Richmond, VA
Afrikana Film Festival
Thu, Sep 14-Sun, Sep 17, $

Tampa, FL
FAMU Tampa Classic
Florida A & M University (FAMU) Rattlers hosts
the Tennessee State Tigers
Raymond James Stadium
Sat, Sep 16, 6p, $

International
Port Of Harlem Gambian Education Partnership's Annual Fundraiser
Goal: $1,950
Raised: $1,340
Need to Raise: $610
by Sep 16

Coming
Film and Discussion with reporter Sam Ford (ABC7/News Channel 8)
Black Slaves, Red Masters

Sat, Sept 30, 11a–1p, $5

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The Dos and Dont's of
Talking to Kids of Color
About White Supremacy



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dred and harriet scott

This country was built by "citizens," Steve Bannon said on 60 Minutes. Reality check: Africans were not considered citizens, Africans were not even considered human.

Pictured: Dred and Harriet Scott statue in St. Louis, MO where their freedom case began. The Supreme Court later declared that Africans were not and could never be citizens of the United States and had NO rights a White man was bound to respect. See: Descendants of Enslaved and Oppressors Met in St. Louis

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banana condom

No More Condoms?

Also see update of this article:
HIV Prevention: Still Relevant in 2017
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