Talking to Kids About White Supremacy | The Wizard of Hip | Blues Museums

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August 31 – September 13, 2017
 
 
 
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On The Dock This Issue:
 
black child
The Dos and Dont's of Talking to Kids of Color About White Supremacy
Now that you’re settling into the reality that the images we saw from Charlottesville were from 2017 and not the days of Jim Crow . . .
 
The Wizard of Hip?
However, the rest of the audience enjoyed it. I can tell by their laughter and interactions with the action on stage.
 
Blues Museums Planted Along the Mississippi
Blues museums now blossom along the Mississippi River from Mississippi to Missouri and soon to Illinois.
 
Remembering Rosemary Reed Miller
During the ceremony, her son, Paul, Jr., said that his mother donated her body to ovarian cancer research.
 
Despite #45
From Memphis correcting Civil Rights era transgressions to bands no longer having “war chants,” Americans have managed to continue building a more inclusive and diverse nation in the #45 era.
 
POHGEP Still $1,235 Short | Only 15 New Subscribers
“We have been meeting our goals since 2002. With your help, we expect to meet this year’s goal, especially since the American economy is doing so well,” added board member Lisa Jenkins.
 
Activities
Interesting, diverse things to do
 
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See what is most popular in Port Of Harlem's e-mailed issue, and on our web, Pinterest, and Facebook pages.
 
 
 
Features

The Dos and Dont's of Talking to Kids of Color About White Supremacy


black child

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Now that you’re settling into the reality that the images we saw from Charlottesville were from 2017 and not the days of Jim Crow, it’s time to get proactive about parenting during the 45 Era. Though you might have hoped that your children would grow up in a different world from where you came from, the swamp has arisen and racism, anti-Semitism, xenophobia, Islamophobia, homophobia, transphobia, and misogyny are alive and slithering along the ground.

So what should you say to your children post-Charlottesville? Now is not the time to tiptoe around tough topics or give your children unclear messages about your values and beliefs or the realities of what happens when bigotry and terror suddenly escalate, as Deandre Harris and Heather Heyer tragically experienced over the weekend.

These dos and don’ts will help guide your parenting in this time of unhooded White supremacy.

Read More

Also from Our Archives:  Are You a Secondary Guardian to White Skin Privilege?



It is important to say: I am not neutral. The dynamics of white supremacy, which are addressed here, have affected my life. So, let me put my cards on the table: I am a “dark-skinned” woman with “light-skinned” children and grandchildren. The experiences of those I love have been radically different from my own and have informed and expanded my thinking.

Read More

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MetroStage
 
 
 
The Wizard of Hip?


the wiz of hip



Warning:  My favorite stage plays are dramatic, thought-provoking, and educational. This one was not.

However, the rest of the audience enjoyed it. I can tell by their laughter and interactions with the action on stage as I nodded during the misnamed “The Wizard of Hip,” now playing at MetroStage.

“He does everything. To see him (Thomas W. Jones II) on stage is amazing,” said David Cole of College Park, Maryland after the performance. Jones is a MetroStage standard. Since 2001, he has written and/or directed plays from “Two Queens, One Castle,” to “The Gin Game,” two of my favorite performances at MetroStage.

In this production, Jones is out front, on stage, and in a comedic, mostly monologue, commentary on life. He has two attractive backups, who sing and dance along with him, as he comments on diverse and unpredictable subjects from Sidney Poitier in film, name calling, war, and sex to death. Even the ending is unpredictable with his talking about his daughter wanting to go to heaven immediately; instead he takes her to - - well, no need to spoil the ending.

“It was good,” thought Vanessa Petty of SE Washington. “It takes you back in the day,” she continued. The play reminded her of a comedy club, with hip-hop song and dance.

Though Jones warned that White folks may not understand some of the dialogue, Sue Frankin of Vienna, VA said she got it. She, sitting with her husband, Robert, summed up some of my other thoughts, “He is doing a fabulous job, but the title of the play disconnects to what the play is really about.”
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Blues Museums Planted Along the Mississippi


pianola



Blues museums now blossom along the Mississippi River from Mississippi to Missouri and soon to Illinois. Of course, the blues music has its seed in Africa. And, after a rough ride over the Atlantic Ocean, it took root and grew in the Mississippi Delta before spreading northward against the River’s southward flow. Some blues seedlings even landed out west.

Eventually, my feet will land in them all. However, the first off my bucket list is the National Blues Museum in St. Louis.

The National Blues Museum in St. Louis is not very large, but very much alive by its inclusion of a state of the art theater and the live streaming of the concerts and a radio show.

Of course, there is a tribute to Ma Rainey, the mother of the Blues, and a walk through of how Ragtime led to the Blues, which lead to Rock-n-Roll. And, the architecture of the center is great and symbolic including a drop down ceiling that replicates railroad ties - - representing the musicians' travels from the south to the north.

One of their intriguing artifacts is a pianola (1880-1920) or self-playing piano, which became obsolete with the advent of records (1920-present), which feel sway to 8-tracks (1960-1975), which died with the birth of cassette tapes (1975-1990), which saw it last days with the coming of CDs (1983-2000), which are now just a remembrance due to the birth of MP3 (2000-present).

To top off the historical musical trip down blues alley, Sugarfire Smoke House serves some the best barbecue, right next door.

The museums left for picking include the Robert Johnson Heritage & Blues Museum in Cool Springs, Mississippi; The Gateway to the Blues Museum on The Blues Highway (Highway 61) in Tunica, Mississippi; the B.B King Museum & Delta Interpretive Center in Indianola, Mississippi; Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale, Mississippi; The Rock & Blues Museum also in Clarksdale, Mississippi; and The Highway 61 Blues Museum in Leland, Mississippi.

Across the Mississippi line, there is the Memphis Blues Hall of Fame in Memphis, Tennessee and coming just to the east of the river’s flow in Chicago, Illinois, the Chicago Blues Experience plans to open in Spring 2019.

But the blues just didn’t follow the Mississippi River or the Illinois Central Gulf Railroad out of the Delta, it also went west. You will also find the Houston Blues Museum in Houston, Texas and the California Jazz and Blues Museum in Los Angeles, California.

Note: See Activities below for current blues performances in St. Louis and Washington, DC.
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Remembering Rosemary Reed Miller

rosemary reed miler



More than 250 people attended the standing room only memorial service for Toast and Strawberries owner Rosemary Reed Miller, Wednesday, August 23, 2017. During the ceremony, her son, Paul, Jr., said that his mother donated her body to ovarian cancer research. The Yeadon, Pennsylvania native passed after a four year battle with ovarian cancer Wednesday, August 2, 2017 says her daughter Sabrina Miller Ford. During the ceremony it way also revealed that Reed Miller threw a party to announce her stage four diagnosis.

During testimonials, friends often shared how she was inclusive of others and a provider of opportunities. Entrepreneur Wanda Jackson wrote on the Port Of Harlem Facebook page, “Rosemary carried our line of black greeting cards, when places like Hallmark, Giant, Safeway, and CVS wouldn't even return my phone calls. She was revolutionary.”

Before operating the boutique near Connecticut and R Streets, NW, Reed-Miller had been a writer for several newspapers from the Afro-American Newspapers and The Washington Post to papers in Kingston, Jamaica and San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Reed Miller not only provided space for readers to pick up Port Of Harlem at Toast and Strawberries, when we were in print, but also contributed a history article on Afro-American fashioned designers. The family is still selling the groundbreaking historical book, “The Threads of Time, the Fabric of History” with the proceeds going to the Paul Miller Loan Fund at Howard University Law School and ovarian cancer research. 

The Washington Ethical Society hosted the memorial service. According to church officials, members tend to place emphasis on “deed before creed,” “how we act,” and on “actions in our lives.” During the memorial service much emphasis was placed on Miller-Reed’s actions in life including her unexpected gathering after her learning of her life-threatening diagnosis and what she decided to do with her remains.

You may view or add condolences on her Facebook page.
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Despite #45

maggie walker statue, richmond va



From Memphis correcting Civil Rights era transgressions to bands no longer having “war chants,” Americans have managed to continue building a more inclusive and diverse nation in the #45 era.

- Memphis pledges $900K to 1968 sanitation Strikers - Mayor Jim Strickland made the announcement inside the National Civil Rights Museum, home to the Lorraine Motel where Martin Luther King Jr. was killed in 1968, as the city prepares to commemorate the 50th anniversary of King's death and the strike next year. Workers went on strike over working conditions and low pay after a garbage truck malfunctioned and crushed to death sanitation workers Echol Cole and Robert Walker.

- A 10-foot bronze statue of Maggie Lena Walker was unveiled in the Jackson Ward neighborhood of downtown Richmond, VA. Walker, whose mother was a former slave, was a civil rights leader, newspaper publisher, teacher, businesswoman, and the first female to charter a bank in the United States.

- Calumet City became the latest Chicago suburb to pass a welcoming city ordinance. City council members voted unanimously to declare the nearly 70 percent Black community "a fair and equal city for immigrants," giving "more teeth" to a sanctuary city resolution that's been on the books since 2009.

- The University of Illinois will no longer play the "war chant" associated with its former mascot Chief Illiniwek at sporting events. A number of reasons were cited as prompting the decision to end the tradition, including that it is considered culturally insensitive to Native Americans and others, and that it failed to promote an inclusive environment.

- "We should call evil by its name. My brother didn't give his life fighting Hitler for Nazi ideas to go unchallenged here at home. –OGH," said Senator Orin Hatch after the murders in Charlottsville, VA. The NAACP recently gave Hatch a 25 percent approval rating, which equates to a grade of F.

- After the Charlottsville, VA terrorist incident, a group of protesters in Durham, N.C. toppled a Confederate monument in front of a courthouse in the city’s downtown area. The Root reports that the protestors were White. Recently, North Carolina has been home to some of the most racially charged incidents. (See North Carolina Goddam)
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POHGEP Still $1,235 Short | Only 15 New Subscribers

ebrima jallow



Port Of Harlem magazine's charity, The Port Of Harlem Gambian Education Partnership, kicked off is annual fundraising effort with $240 collected in the first week and a half - - with an additional $1,235 needed by Saturday, September 16, 2017.

Despite the income shortfall, the 15-year-old charity shipped two barrels of mostly gently used clothing to two Gambian groups. “That is very good.  We are all happy for the information (that the barrels are coming). Thank you and thanks to your friends, too,” said Buba Camara, president of the Baobab Youth Development Association, upon hearing of the barrels shipment.

“We have been meeting our fundraising goals since 2002. With your help, we expect to meet this year’s goal, especially since the American economy is doing so well,” added board member Lisa Jenkins.

The magazine is also in campaign mode, with a subscription drive. On August 24, the magazine held New Subscribers Day and asked its subscribers to email five (5) friends and ask them to subscribe to the free publication. At press time, the effort garnered only about 15 new subscriptions.

“While subscriptions are slowly coming in, I appreciate the many readers who have participated and subscriber Donna Smith (Silver Spring, MD) for suggesting it in our recent survey,” says publisher Wayne Young. Readers including M. Willis (Memphis); E. Skinner (Brooklyn, New York), K. Fowler (Maryland), Maxine M. (Washington, DC), and Buba Jallow (Banjul, The Gambia) have sent messages to us about their efforts. Young noted that LIKES on Facebook continue to grow at a much faster pace than new email subscriptions to the magazine.

In our recent survey, 39 percent of our readers often suggest to friends that they sign up for Port Of Harlem. Slightly more, 45 percent, are subscribers and Facebook friends with Port Of Harlem. Because Facebook decides what posting readers receive, Facebook friends are not guaranteed to get Port Of Harlem postings or the magazine.

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Activities

the devil's music


Washington
The Devil’s Music: The Life and Blues of Bessie Smith
from the Mosaic Theater Company
Atlas Performing Arts Center
1333 H Street, NE
now through Sun, Sep 24, $40-$60

17th Library of Congress National Book Festival
Walter E. Washington Convention Center
Sat, Sep 2, 8:30a-7:30p, free

From Prison to the Stage
Safe Streets Arts Foundation – Prison to Art Gallery
(Prisoner Multi-media Poetry Event)
Kennedy Center
Sat, Sep 2, 8p, free

Iola's Letter: The Memphis Crusade of Ida B. Wells
(scenes from Michon Boston's play)
Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital
921 Pennsylvania Ave, SE
Wed, Sep 13, 7p, $13

Baltimore

The Christians
Baltimore Center Stage
700 N Calvert Street
Thu, Sep 7-Sun, Oct 8, $

Chicago/Gary
African Festival of the Arts in Chicago
Washington Park
5100 S. Cottage Grove Ave
Fri, Sep 1-Mon, Sep 4,10a-10p, $

Los Angeles
Adrienne D. Williams’
MS.RPRSNTD
Space 15 Twenty
Urban Outfitter’s LA concept store
1520 N Cahuenga Blvd
Thu, Sep 7-Sun, Sep 10, free

New York
The Peculiar Patriot
National Black Theater
2031 Fifth Avenue
Wed, Sep 13-Sun, Oct 1, $

St. Louis
22nd Annual Muddy Waters Blues Festival
LaClede’s Landing
Fri, Sep 1-Sun, Sep 3, $

Albert King
National Blues Museum
615 Washington Ave
Sat, Sep 2, $

Coming
Washington, DC
2017 Ronald H. Brown African Affairs Series
Convened by the Constituency for Africa
Tue, Sep 18-Fri, Sep 22, free and $
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